4 Steps to career change success: #Perform

4 Steps to career change success: #Perform

In the final blog in our series highlighting what you need to consider when changing your role or career, we look at what you need to do when you receive new job offers, negotiate a package that suits you and make a lasting impression in your new position. In the previous blog we looked at how to build a personal brand and how you will be found by potential recruiters, looking beyond a well-crafted CV and into the multiple social media channels that support your professional profile. This final stage, perform, is another exciting phase for those we support to change roles and find career success. At this point we have worked through the previous stages – coming to terms with redundancy or leaving your role, exploring new options and shaping your brand and seeking offers – and the people we support are now getting new job offers and making career decisions. At this point, we’ve supported clients to make sure they can secure two or three good offers. However, this is the time that needs the most careful consideration and our role is to help people work through the thought process as they decide which direction to take. We work with people to look back at Explore to understand what their ideal role would be. Together, we consider the best fit from the offers received and also look at what the compromises will be. This can be challenging as the temptation is often to go for the best-looking job and there is a danger that you don’t properly consider the compromises or the potential consequences. For example, in...
4 Steps to career change success:  #3 Secure

4 Steps to career change success:  #3 Secure

This is the 4th in our series outlining how Newleaf supports our clients through career transition. In our last brief we highlighted the importance of achieving real clarity on what a next move should be.  Equipped with this, clients will be able to streamline their search and really focus on doing a brilliant job of securing those roles they do go for. If a client thinks that a great CV, strong track record and charming personality are enough to secure their next move – they need to think again.  The recruitment market is fast changing.  Most people we meet have not been in the job market for at least 3 years, and for some of our clients this is much longer.  Let’s just consider some of the changes that have happened in recent years: Increased use of social media sites Digital job boards and career sites LinkedIn Video interviewing On line psychometric tests Pre screening and testing on mobile devices Strengths based profiling and selection We try to equip our clients with an up to date understanding of the different types of recruitment processes that they may be subjected to in today’s recruitment market. From the very beginning, we encourage clients to consider their personal brand.  Determine what impact they want to create and what steps they are taking to achieve this. How do you present yourself in writing, on the telephone, face-to-face, both one on one and in groups? Dodgy e-mail addresses, rudimentary typing mistakes, unclear verbal communication and unfortunate personal presentation are all too common. Food stuck in teeth, ill fitting or inappropriate clothes and overpowering odours...
4 Steps to career change success: #2 Explore

4 Steps to career change success: #2 Explore

In the 3rd of our series about how Newleaf supports our clients through career transition, we share the importance of taking time to establish real clarity on the next career move. Explore and clarify your next career move I had a wise grandmother who had lived through 2 world wars, was a career woman and knew how to enjoy herself.  I have many fond memories of her and one piece of advice always sticks in my mind, “Make sure you have no regrets by the time you get to my age” (then in her 80’s). This is at the front of my mind when supporting clients to identify their next career move.  Many of our clients are facing the prospect of a career change prompted by redundancy.  Whilst this is not always welcomed, for the vast majority of our clients this turns into a positive opportunity.  Very often, for the first time in their lives they are being asked, “So what do you REALLY want to do?”  We provide some tools and techniques to stimulate and process their thinking, coupled with high quality attention.  We encourage them to explore their thoughts about what they may, could, perhaps dream of doing. Some people feel that indulging in this kind of thought process is a luxury they don’t have time for when concerned about how they will pay the mortgage in a few months.  My advice, you can’t not afford the time.  A few years ago I had an initial meeting with a client.  They was clearly anxious about how they would support their family and before meeting had diligently been applying...
4 Steps to career change success: #1 Stabilise

4 Steps to career change success: #1 Stabilise

If you are personally facing the prospect of redundancy or you are a Company having to make the tough decision to make others redundant then we really recommend you follow this series of blogs and see how Newleaf enables our clients to face into this transition and achieve positive success.  Position yourself for positive change  In my many years experience in HR I think I have witnessed a broad range of responses to redundancy: ‘How am I going to pay my mortgage?’ ‘No-one will employ me at my age.’ ‘I’ve only ever done this, I can’t do anything else!’ ‘I don’t know how to tell my family.’ ‘I don’t understand why this has happened to me.’ Redundancy is one of life’s top 5 most stressful events, so ensuring you or your employees get the right support is a key part of your social responsibility. So, what support do we offer in this potentially traumatic initial phase of career transition support?  Firstly, we listen. With a confidential and empathetic ear is a good starting point. We offer independent, confidential and non- judgemental support through strong rapport and high quality listening.  Ranting, venting, crying and rationalising are all absolutely encouraged – we prefer to hear this rather than potential future networking contacts. We then need to move from a counselling role into a coaching role to enable our clients to move forward. This is a delicate process and as seasoned professionals our team read this well. We support our clients to achieve a good exit from their current employer as this is an important step in terms of closure, self-respect and...
Turn redundancy into an opportunity: 4 steps to career change success

Turn redundancy into an opportunity: 4 steps to career change success

As a seasoned HR Director and now the proud MD of Newleaf Limited, I am passionate about providing results focussed outplacement support.  Putting people through a process and pretending we have done our job is just not what we are about in Newleaf. Our results speak for themselves: With our help, 97% of employees displaced in a recent factory closure found their next career step in just 3 months. When we analysed what makes our approach so successful, the following became clear: Our approach is flexible to the needs of the individual’s we work with (i.e. it is NOT formulaic – even when we work with large groups) We enable and empower our clients to drive their own success We support and facilitate our clients through 4 distinct phases using strong coaching skills and domain expertise. This is the first of a series of blogs where we will explore these phases in more detail. Let’s start with an overview. Phase 1:  Stabilise – Positioning yourself for Positive Change  There’s no denying that being made redundant is very stressful and can induce feelings of panic and anger.  Here we provide a confidential space to enable our clients to get their head round what can sometimes be a traumatic transition, even if it was their decision to leave.  It is essential to face this otherwise there is a real danger of people turning up for their next job interview full of baggage and offloading latent feelings of bitterness about their situation.  Understandable – but not what an interviewer wants to hear! Phase 2:  Explore: So what do you really want to...

6 Reasons you should invest in supporting the staff you are making redundant

Susan Binnersley – Founding Director and Career Coach As an HR professional operating largely in UK manufacturing for over 20 years I have clocked up a vast amount of experience in the field of redundancy management.  I have had people responsibility for several site closures, whole business restructuring to factor in new capabilities and have managed many senior leaders out of businesses, including even my own CEO.  It would be macabre to suggest I take pleasure in this, but what I do pride myself with is that if tough decisions have to be made, then the people affected are treated as individuals, with respect and with support to move on to pastures new.  In all of these situations, I have parted with people on good terms, with a genuine handshake and mutual respect in tact.   For the past 10 years I have had the opportunity to use this experience in a very tangible and constructive way by providing meaningful and bespoke outplacement support and career transition coaching to companies and their employees also going through redundancy and restructuring.   In Newleaf we enable individuals facing redundancy to come to terms with this stressful situation (it’s up there as 1 of 5 of life’s most stressful events).  We support them in exploring what they really want to do next and then offer them honest and pragmatic support to find this new role.   So why should companies, already potentially facing financial hardship, bother to fund this support for their departing employees?  Well – here are 6 good reasons.   It’s morally the right thing to do – if you...

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